Item

Mackenzie Shay Oral History 2020/05/15

Media

Title (Dublin Core)

Mackenzie Shay Oral History 2020/05/15

Description (Dublin Core)

This interview is a part of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire HIST 486 seminar class, and its project The Chippewa Valley Covid-19 Archive. The professor is Dr. Cheryl Jimenez Frei.

Recording Date (Dublin Core)

Creator (Dublin Core)

Event Identifier (Dublin Core)

Partner (Dublin Core)

Controlled Vocabulary (Dublin Core)

Curator's Tags (Omeka Classic)

Collection (Dublin Core)

English

Date Submitted (Dublin Core)

07/14/2020

Date Modified (Dublin Core)

10/21/2020
11/17/2020
02/23/2021
03/08/2021

Date Created (Dublin Core)

05/15/2020

Interviewer (Bibliographic Ontology)

Abigail Jurusik

Interviewee (Bibliographic Ontology)

Mackenzie Shay

Location (Omeka Classic)

54703
Eau Claire
United States

Format (Dublin Core)

Video

Language (Dublin Core)

English

Transcription (Omeka Classic)

*This transcript was created using AI and is not considered an official transcript of this interview*


Abigail Jurusik
Okay, and it looks like we're recording. So today is May 15, 2020. So far there are 1.46 million cases of COVID-19 in the United States, where 255,000 people have recovered and 87,218 have died. Our interview you interviewee is currently in Eau Claire, Wisconsin and in Wisconsin, there are 11,275 cases of COVID-19 and 434 people have died. Okay, so it is 2:31pm so what is your name?

Mackenzie Shay
Mackenzie Shay.

Abigail Jurusik
Alright, and do you mind sharing your demographic information for the study?

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah, of course. So I am currently 22, I Identify as a female, and would be considered white.

Abigail Jurusik
So what are the primary things that you do on a day to day basis such as your job or in your or extra curricular activities and how they've been affected by COVID-19?

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah, I mean, what I'm doing at the moment because of COVID-19 are a lot different than what I had been doing prior to this. Before COVID-19 I---so I coach figure skating, and I'm also on the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire's, synchronized skating team. I participate on the State Board of learning educators for Wisconsin, and I am currently attending University of Wisconsin Eau Claire to get my degree in education, along with another job that I do is I work at Sylvan Learning Center here in Eau Claire. And so a lot of that's had to shift and a lot of things have changed these past couple months now, I guess, because of the Covid 19. So the skating rinks closed down within weeks of this starting within about a week, all the skating to close down, so I'm not coaching right now, the synchro season for the university had to be shut, basically shut down short, along with --- we were supposed to be doing our final a show with the Eau Claire community and they had to cancel that show and that was really unfortunate for all of the seniors who get to do their senior show, usually. And also another rink that I coach at Wisconsin had to cancel their show too. And that was really unfortunate for all those skaters. So at the moment, I'm doing I'm finishing up my classes online. But the hardest part about that is for me, I was supposed to be taking classes---couple different classes of mine actually having experience in the schools doing observation even leading classes for one of mine, I supposed to be teaching like a Spanish class and it was like an after school type program class. And all of that had to be cancelled. We couldn't be in the schools doing any of that. So I'm missing all that experience now, which is really unfortunate. But I am fortunate enough to be have been working at Sylvan learning center so I'm at least getting some experience still, whereas most of my peers have none. Because I am still doing like virtual tutoring through Sylvan with some students working with them. Since all students are online right now taking classes online, they're struggling with homework and getting that done. So I've been doing a lot of homework help, and just kind of helping students maintain their learning during this time. So my days have kind of become a lot like--- I spend somebody from 10am to 6:10pm tutoring because there's so many students that are needing that right now. And then I'll try and get my classwork and just kind of it's some of it I feel like is almost an additional busy work that's been added because we have to do something since we're not able to be in the schools. Most of my professors have been really great about finding like really useful articles for us to read and respond to. So it's not---most of mine's not too much busy work, but I know that sometimes some of the things around they're like, well, we have to come up with something to do. So here's this discussion to talk about. But thankfully, I have really good peers who make these discussions really useful. Whereas I know some classes aren't going as well just because---they---it's hard to do things online within a person, but we're all making it work as best we can.

Abigail Jurusik
All right, nice. Nice. So what's it currently like to live in Eau Claire Wisconsin.

Mackenzie Shay
It's it is a nice area to be right now because there are at least a lot of parks and people can still get outside and go for walks. I have my boyfriend's been staying with me. So the two of us are able to go and go for walks but it's really sad to not be able to like see friends because I have friends who are A year but I can't really get together with them. I can't see them. I know that some people, I've seen some people out with friends but I think it's most people that they're living with already. So it's Auclair hasn't gone as strict. I feel like it's some areas I've seen. Some people have a lot more, like really strict precautions about going out places. We have a lot of our like craft stores in Wisconsin are closed, which is kind of a bummer. Like, I know, because I've seen, for example, like Joanne, I get their emails and stuff from Georgia fabrics. And I'd seen stuff like oh, like curbside pickups available, but they're not actually doing that. Oh, Claire. That was from like a Minnesota one. That's because that's what I'm signed up for the emails. So we have some of our own grocery stores. Everything is still open. And there are a lot of people who don't you see wearing masks is just like a new a new normal kind of minutes. It's weird, but it's it is what it is. But it is unfortunate that a lot of places have closed down. Although mostly Fridays, like two days ago now on Wednesday, a bill was passed and the bars have opened in Eau Claire. So a lot of the bars were really busy last night. I was seeing, like pictures from people I didn't go out personally because I don't know. I don't feel very safe doing that yet. But I do know that they are opening up again and so people are just really excited to get back out.

Abigail Jurusik
Right, right. So when you first learned about COVID-19 over your, like, initial thoughts about it.

Mackenzie Shay
I think it was just a lot of like, confusion and uncertainty, especially because everything it just kind of like happened all at once. Like all of a sudden, here's this disease and like, you know, I'd heard about it obviously, as a child, I was like, Oh, no, like, that's unfortunate. That's a problem. And I knew that it was something we should be worried about. But it obviously hadn't gotten here yet. It didn't get here till months later. From like when I think the original endzone, something like that. I don't honestly don't remember exactly anymore because I feel like it's all just kind of melded together. But I was, you know, when I first heard about it, it was concerning and my mom actually works as an English teacher for students in China. So I was able to kind of when it first came out, like I was seeing the impact of it because they were at home already. Her students were at home during the day. So she was kind of talking to me about how she had students at home all day, so she was doing different hours. So I knew that it was important, but I didn't really feel the impact of it till it came here. And once it basically hit United States and then Wisconsin, it was within like, I feel like a matter of hours, things were shutting down and every minute we were getting updates about changes and what was happening in this was closed. This was not closed yet. And then oh wait. Now it is closed and So it's just a whole lot of confusion and uncertainty those first like two weeks, I feel like it was just like, overwhelming. It was kind of a mixture. Like, I remember feeling stressed and confused and just like numb, because I didn't really know what was happening.

Abigail Jurusik
Mm hmm. So how have your thoughts like changed since first learning about it?

Mackenzie Shay
I almost feel at this point, like it's been going on for so long, but I almost just become. Again, I'm gonna use this word like numb to it because it's a matter of like it's here. And it's what's happening. But I kind of almost forget about like the severity of it. Because it's just, it's been going on for so long now. And I'm just like, this is just what we're doing. And I'm like, Oh, wait, like when I go to the stores, I'm like, there is actually like a pandemic going on and things are different.

Abigail Jurusik
It looks like you've paused a bit Wait, wait, just give it a second. All right. Yeah, you're buffering a bit. Okay, why don't you try saying something? What was that okay. Okay, okay, I think we're caught up now. Yeah. All right.

Mackenzie Shay
Okay, so what was I saying? Oh, I mean, we're talking about how it's changed, correct?

Abigail Jurusik
Yeah. Yeah. Like how your thoughts have changed. Um,

Mackenzie Shay
so yeah, it's sometimes like I've become unaware of the severity of it just because it's been going on for so long and I feel like I'm My thoughts are changing all the time. I'm actually going to turn you really quick an assignment here, but there are something like I'm still reminded of how much of an issue this is, for example, like right across the street from me at the moment right now, which is why I've been on the other side of the house to begin with, as a food drive that they do every Friday here. No, Claire. Help people who are without jobs right now, because that is a really big issue. So I don't know if you can see that going on over there. But they have the CMA people who bank over there. So it's really nice that they're doing that in the community. And I know there's a couple different days where they have that going on in different places around the community. But I feel like I guess my thoughts in general, are that I forget, like I mentioned, I kind of forget the severity of it sometimes. But I also keep seeing things about how it is very severe. And I don't know, when this is going to change and how I really, I don't know how we're going to be able to actually go back fully into like, normal routines like they were before until we come up with some sort of vaccine or way to stop this because I keep seeing more and more articles about how contagious This is, as we're learning more about it and how much of an issue it can be. Had I think that sometimes, you know, sometimes I'm thinking Okay, maybe it's not as bad as they're saying, like, maybe we're actually all gonna die from it. But then I see things about how it is really impacting people. So then I realized that that is still a problem. And I'm honestly wondering at this point now, if we're going to be able to go back to normal until there is a vaccine, which I've heard anywhere from September to April, and I'm mostly what I'm hearing is that it won't be totally next April. That's gonna be a whole year of this isolation. So, yeah.

Abigail Jurusik
So you've now you've shown us, the food bank across the street, that's helping people but how else how else has like your community risen up? COVID-19 like, what are other things that are being done to help people

Mackenzie Shay
in the community, there's a lot of like school districts who are trying to help and just make sure that the students are still having food and being able to eat and there's been a lot of support in the community for like small businesses and trying to keep them alive by doing a lot of like, be like pick up curbside pickup for small businesses that are able to stay open. That's been a big thing, like a big. I guess focus for the community has been trying keeps the small businesses in our community alive. And also lately, there's been a lot of focus on high school seniors because they're missing out on graduation. So I know there's a lot of places around the country that are trying to come up with ways to honor these high school seniors. And that's the big one that I'm hearing about right now is a lot of like different news stations are trying to put together things for seniors and virtual commencements and kind of just talking about ways that we can help high school seniors as well as the people in our community by just kind of keeping them safe with the different regulations that are still in place and being asked to wear masks at Target and the other store. I heard But very recently menards I believe it was and put it in a a regulation, I guess you could say, where people have to wear masks and as you're going into the stores, like they're taking people's temperatures to try and see what's going on and keep people healthy. And I know like, Sylvan, we're going to try. We are going to be opening up in center again in June with unlimited people coming in. But it'll be that same thing. Every time students come in, like everybody has to wear masks and every time any, like students, teachers, any of us come in, we'll be checking our temperatures as well to try and make sure that we're all staying as healthy as we can be.

Abigail Jurusik
Right, right. So how are the people around you responding to the covid 19 pandemic?

Mackenzie Shay
That's a lot of it was a lot of confusion at first and just a lot of like worried. But as this kind of settle into routines, I feel like people are kind of in their routines and is what it is, but people are getting antsy now. And it's been going on for so long that I see a lot of people began seeing more and more people starting to go out and seeing friends and getting together with other people again. And, you know, it's, I think for the most part, they're all saying, you know, limited in the number of people that they're getting together with. But there is some amount of people going out and going to see people again and going to visit other people because they're tired of being at home. So I am seeing that not from a lot of people, but I am seeing that for some people.

Abigail Jurusik
Yeah, so I noticed in your window that you have a rainbow and some hearts. Is that something like else like the community is doing during the outbreak?

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah, um, so the rainbow is actually for in Eau Claire, we had done. Some of the houses were trying to, like put rainbows in the window and do like a rainbow walk kind of suddenly kindergarden wants to hear like a rainbow hunch, and there's rainbows and all the windows that they can look for. And then the hearts are just for just kinda like the world of hearts. It's going on, like nationwide to just show support. And I've seen a lot of windows and I'll clear up different houses, different businesses that all have the hearts of them as well.

Abigail Jurusik
Nice. No, no, but that's really nice. So you've talked about how this has affected you a little bit as a student, but can you tell us a little bit more like what is your major and spending on graduating?

Mackenzie Shay
Yep. So I'm, I have a double major in English education, Spanish education. So basically, the biggest impact of this for me has been so this is my I will be graduating in December, assuming everything is able to go to plan stuff. And for me this semester, I'm in what's called our blocks semester for teachers, which is the one either right before Eastern teach, or sometimes you'll do this one and then they'll be like a catch up semester for yourself. Rather than judging, but for me, this is the one right before student teaching. So along with the rest of my cohort that's in my block with me, none of us are able to be in the school right now doing our in class placements. And this is something that's really challenging because we haven't had some of us haven't had any in class room like experience in the classrooms we observations are helping since our freshman years, and most of us are seniors now. So it's been a long time. So this block is usually really important because it's three hours every day you get to go and observe a classroom and you get the most experience. I feel like teaching like you need that hands on experience. You need to be able to be in the classroom, working with students to see how all the teachers are teaching, kind of feeling what styles would be working in the future. So I'm missing out on all of that right now. And going forward into the fall. I'm not sure what's gonna happen with student teaching. I was supposed to be getting placements earlier this week, at the beginning of the semester, like a meeting event set up for Mondays when we would have all gotten our placements because they're trying to figure everything out. We haven't gotten those yet. Supposed to be getting an email any day here now with updates on what student teaching placements are gonna be looking like and they will probably try to place us is what it sounds like with teachers. And then it's kind of up to the district and I guess this state at this point on whether schools are open and what we're going to be doing, because it is sounding like there's a very, very good chance that come fall we will be back to still doing online school. I know that a lot of like professors at the University have already planned for that. For like their classes. So for me as a student teacher, it's going to be many of the beach teaching online in the fall which is a very different and interesting experience and I'm hoping that at least by second quarter, I could have at least one of my experiences in the classroom because I don't have any in class experience that's very, very detrimental to my degree. Sure, excuse me. So I think that it's just really unfortunate and I'm really hoping that we're able to get in class because there is a possibility that if we aren't able to go into the schools and be having in person experiences that my graduation date might have to push to the spring I might have to take it like a gap semester. So I have in person experience since we, those of us that are blocked right now aren't getting it right now. And if it is, so much fall we will be eating so I could potentially affect my graduation date. There's no like kind of word on anything at the moment, which is also a little bit kind of annoying. I've kind of gotten over being stressed about it because nobody can control it. And it is what it is. But it is annoying, but I don't really know what's going to happen for sure in the future. It would be nice to have some information, but I would just kind of wait and see, I guess.

Abigail Jurusik
So how do you see COVID-19 impacting like teachers in like classrooms like it like afterwards?

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah. So something that I'm seeing right now is basically this whole entire fourth quarter, which is, since it'll, at least in the district, the schools finished third quarter. And that was like, the last day that they were allowed to be in school happened to be the last day of third quarter. So this whole fourth quarter that's been online students, which basically means that this whole fourth quarter, with the amount of students that that I'm working with, it's really kind of gonna be a wash almost I feel like they're not they're not actually learning the material. Based on what I'm seeing, I'm worried that a lot of students are just going online to find answers that they're, you know, they're just kind of filling out the worksheet, they're not really retaining the information because due to unequal access to internet and resources, we can't be overloading a lot of work. Early teachers can't be I guess. So I'm noticing as I'm helping with the tutoring that I do, that a lot of students aren't understanding the material, they're not getting the material and they're just trying to get the work done. So everything that was taught in this quarter and if we're on Monday in the fall, I think it's gonna be taught then is basically enough to be retaught. When we go back to school students are going to fall so far behind there's the there's the normal like summer slump where students kind of regress and like and that happens every summer when you're not in school students, you know, they they lose information we, we all were trained only certain mountain Lusa. But because it's so much longer, it's going to be twice as hard to go back Everybody being used to being at home for so long, I don't want to go back student. student behavior is going to be all over the chart too. You have students right now who are assumptions, really, school is their safe place, and they don't like being at home. And they just don't have the support that they need at home. So for those students, it's really important to get back into the school. But for other students, it's going to be difficult to go back to school. You know, they're at home right now, or they can be doing whatever they want to be doing. And once they go back to school, they're gonna have to get back to the rules and the regulations and policies. School comes up. So it's gonna it's gonna be a challenge for everyone.

Abigail Jurusik
So how has COVID-19 affected you and your families, or you and your boyfriend's day to day activities? You mentioned going on walks but like what else have you guys been doing over time

Mackenzie Shay
and watching a lot of movies and just A lot of I mean, we both been trying to figure out so he's currently student teaching with the online student teaching so it's just kind of a process of being able to get our work done at home. I'm doing tutoring he's no grading and putting in assignments. So we kind of spent all day doing that and then right now honestly, by the time that evening rolls around, I'm exhausted I'm basically you know, I should do my own school work still and I'm just kind of exhausted and it's been kind of hard because I haven't really had as much time it's nice like today's a beautiful day so I'm hoping to be able to spend some time outside today and get outside and go for walks or we can go to the park we have a lake right near our house here. Not too far away or and then some rivers around us. We'll play school over. So we have been doing sometimes we'll go during the day, we'll go out on the These days, and he'll go fishing and I'll bring my book and sit by the water with him and read my book. Well, he's fishing. So that's been fun. But yeah, there's just kind of been a lot of movies and we've honestly had a lot of additional work to be doing. When this first started, I was like, Oh, I'm gonna have so much time to catch up on like these projects I want to do what I can actually do puzzles and read all these books have been wanting to read up and at all. The first, we have three weeks off from classes at the university. So I had some time then and as kids are kind of getting in the routine, I never mentioned that silvan yet. So I was doing a lot of puzzles and stuff then and I was doing some projects that I've been having laying around that I've been wanting to do. But this past month and a half now it's just been basically I get up I go to work, he's doing his grading, I get back, I do my assignments, where maybe watch a movie or a show on Netflix.

Abigail Jurusik
So what would you say your biggest challenges that you've had to face during COVID-19 or

Mackenzie Shay
There's been a lot of uncertainty at first with like money because he was laid off from the job he was doing just because he was a server. So he didn't have that coming in. And my, you know, Job was shifting, I was like, No, I lost my job coaching. I didn't have the income coming in from that from, from silvan. At first, I was like, I don't know if we're actually able to open like what we do. So that was challenging. I'm glad that I've been able to be working with that. So I do have some money coming in from that though. So I think honestly, the biggest challenge has been trying to avoid feeling super depressed all the time, because we're stuck at home. And so it's been just kind of taking care of myself. I mean, I'm still not just eating all the junk food, it's in the house when I get bored and sit and watch TV and eat food. So just kind of taking care of myself. And my like, well being has probably been the biggest challenge that I feel like I've been facing. And just, you know, not being able to see my family and friends like that I'm a people person, I need people. And so that's probably been the hardest part for me right now is not being able to see people.

Abigail Jurusik
How have you been keeping in touch with your family and friends?

Mackenzie Shay
Um, I mean, I text on Snapchat, my friends, I do try to call my mom a couple times a week. But actually something that my family's been doing it's really fun. I love my mom's side of the family is we have we use like the Marco Polo app. I don't know if you've heard of that app, but it's like a fun little like video. And basically, you kind of video record yourself talking to whatever and then it stays on there. And you can go back and watch them later, kind of like a text. And they don't like disappear. So we have like a whole group child, my mom's side of the family. So that's been really fun, just kind of give each other updates throughout the day. And I could just see my little cousins. I have a four year old and two year old little cousin and him so they're always fun to watch when their parents put them on there. So we've been trying to stay connected that way. We played on Mother's Day, we played like a virtual game night via zoom, when my wife went on to zoom and my aunt shared like her screen, and she had downloaded this like online game pack. And then on each of our phones were able to just like go to the website from where the game packs were and just kind of like type in the code and get to play games with each other and then it pop up on the screen like the updates of the scores, everything sounds kind of fun to just keep in touch. There's been a lot more. Yeah, definitely a lot more use of technology, obviously, to keep in touch and I feel like I've been doing a lot more zoom calls with people and just trying to stay in touch as best I can.

Abigail Jurusik
Okay, great. So, uh, a little bit more of a downer topic. Have you or anybody you know, gotten sick during the covid 19 outbreak?

Mackenzie Shay
I'm not specifically with Covid. No, I know some people have been. My brother was tested at one point but he didn't have it. Some other random virus you happen to pick up somewhere. So that was a little bit scary when we didn't really know what was going on with that, because he was presenting basically the same symptoms as COVID. But he was tested and it came back negative. And so it was just some other little virus. And it went away for a day or two after that, so I know that my, my other brother, it wasn't COVID again, but he had really badly, tonsillitis. And that was really hard because he wasn't able this was like at the beginning of all this, so he wasn't able to go into the doctor's office to get the prescriptions he needed. So he was doing like the doctor on demand, I think, which is almost like online doctors basically where you do like a video call like this with a doctor. And they were able to look a certain way like yeah, you need something. But it took a while for them to get better because you can actually go in and get tested and like see what kind of medication you needed. So it's just been like everything is changed and everything is so different.

Abigail Jurusik
Okay, so yeah, and those two situations, like there was worried well If your first brother worried that maybe he had it, and then the second, he wasn't able to get the medical attention he needed right away. Yep. So in what ways do you think that COVID-19 is affecting people's mental or physical health?

Mackenzie Shay
So many, so many ways. I mean, that's been the hardest for me. And I know a lot of people like it just being stuck inside. It's hard to not be around people and it's depressing. And I've talked to a couple people who, you know, myself included, like, I feel like my mood really depends on the weather right now. If it's nice and I can get outside, mentally, I feel a lot better. And also physically because I'm being active. Otherwise, if it's gross, I'm just kind of like, I don't want to do anything. I'm just gonna sit on a couch all day. What else like what why not? Um, so I have, I feel like there's a lot of depression that's happening right now. And So as people who are already diagnosed with depression, I feel like it's probably gotten a lot worse. Because you don't have necessarily motivators to get you up and get you moving. And I know that for me, that's something that's helped in the past when I have felt more depressed. And so it's, it's, I think it's a really big impact on people's mental health. We really need to make sure that we're doing as much self care as we possibly can. And like physical health, I know. There's the whole like COVID 15. For like, a lot of us are sitting at home. We're not getting out and being as active as we would like to be because we have to stay at home. We're kind of just eating, stress eating probably for a lot of us. I know I am, at least I can't talk to everybody, but I know that I tend to stress eat. Oh, and so I've been doing a lot more of that. And I'm trying to stay active and get upside when I can and go for walks like I mentioned, but I think that We're all gonna have a lot of recovering to do after this. For those of you like, have been sick is we're gonna have to recover mentally, physically as well.

Abigail Jurusik
Right so even, like, hopefully when we can get like a vaccine, or you know for this, you think there's going to be like it's that's not going to be the end of the impact of COVID No. Okay. So what have been your primary sources of news during the pandemic?

Mackenzie Shay
Um, honestly like I see a lot of times on my phone like the like Apple news like from the iPhones like in the morning that Apple knew the pop up with like CNN or ABC or just like the different news sources. And so that's where I've been like, I don't watch the news on TV. I don't get a newspaper. I can see no no in last So I saw one of those was. So basically it's my phone, and I will get articles on my phone. And I was like, I'll see a lot of articles on Facebook that people like repost from different news sources. So I'll look at those ones too. But probably like with all of this, my biggest source of news has been through my Apple, Apple news or whatever that is on your phone that kind of like pops up with notifications on news stories as they come out.

Abigail Jurusik
Right, so would you say that how much you've been checking the news has changed with the pandemic?

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah, I think that at first I was checking it all the time. Lately, I've kind of stopped because there hasn't been as many changes. Like we just on Wednesday, there's the bill that was passed that I heard about from somebody else and I honestly haven't even gone to look at it yet. Because I'm like, okay, like, until I actually see things changing. What am I gonna do? No. But at first I was definitely checking it like constantly new quick, was closing wants to say, Oh, wait, does this How long have we closed and I'm just gonna like with Things open, I'm trying.

Abigail Jurusik
So what do you think are important issues that the media may not be covering?

Mackenzie Shay
I think that it's important for the media to be covering kind of as best as I can what's I feel like there's a lot of like, talk about how bad is the virus Really? Is it really helping? Or like, Is it really like as bad as people are saying, is it not? Some people are saying, Oh, it's all a lie. Just kind of keeping up to date with, with what is happening and any progress or declines that are happening, which I feel like they're doing a pretty decent job at but I feel like we could get more updates on that. Especially like in our communities, it's important to know kind of what's happening in our community and I feel like I haven't. At first I was seeing a lot of updates like, regularly with the cases in the Eau Claire. Tony, I haven't seen that as much lately. It could just be again that I'm not as focused on it, though, anymore. But I think that it was also nice. Like the positive news sources are good too, because we do need some positivity. So having any basically positive stories, good stories that can be shared.

Abigail Jurusik
Right. So how have municipal leaders and government officials in your community responded to the outbreak?

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah. Um, so I know that there's been a lot with the leaders. I mean, they're constantly in communication, talking about how, what needs to happen moving forward when we can reopen things, and safe to reopen one of the policies of that. And I know like, firsthand because I am on the State Board of aspiring educators, I've been able to kind of touch base with some of the Wisconsin Board of Education and just kind of get some updates on that. There's been conversations about When is it safe for students to go back? What is the process like, all this is gonna have to be in place. And there's just discussions constantly still about what we can be doing for students what? Like, what features are needed, what communities are needing. So I think that there's just they're doing. I feel like it's not, we don't want to see that there's a lot happening. But I feel like behind the scenes, there's a lot that they're doing constantly to figure out what they need to be doing to keep me safe.

Abigail Jurusik
Do you have any thoughts on how local state or federal leaders are responding to the crisis differently?

Mackenzie Shay
Um, I think it's interesting, because like, I know that there's a lot of difference between Minnesota Wisconsin with our dates, and I'm like, we are so close. Yeah, it's like okay, why, like Minnesota is opening up before we were. And some of the regulations they're more strict than are some are looser. ours, like why? Like I just I don't being as close to Minnesota as we are. We're only an hour away from the border here. I feel like especially if you get to like somewhere like Hudson that's right on the border. I guess I'm just kind of confused why there's so like, every state is so different. I get that, like some states that have a lot more population, like New York, obviously, is going to have to have their own regulations. But I feel like a lot of the ones that are nearby to like in the Midwest here should have similar regulations going on. But, so it's just a little bit confusing with all the different dates, but I know that we are kind of generally following the trends of each other. So,

Abigail Jurusik
okay, all right. Now looking towards the future. Has your experiences transformed how you think about your family, friends and community and if so, in what ways?

Mackenzie Shay
I think that it's just important to make sure that I'm making time for them. Because I'm a really, really busy person. I stay busy all the time. And this has kind of taught me to make time for my family friends, but also to make time for myself. I kind of tend to neglect my self care and I overwork myself. And I don't ever take time for myself, like, ever. Um, you know, I'm the kind of person who is doing stuff constantly. I'm running from one thing to the next and I'm trying to juggle 10 different things at once. And that's not being sarcastic. I had been working six jobs at one point this year and going to school and being involved in multiple different clubs. So I'm juggling a lot. So this was kind of taught me to that it's okay to say no, and that it's okay to not be doing something at every second. Which is then let me be able to have more time to stay in touch with my friends and family and talk to them more. And I'm really Looking forward to being able to like get together with friends and just have time to spend time with friends, rather than running from one thing to the next all the time.

Abigail Jurusik
So had some self reflection then,

Mackenzie Shay
yeah, during all this, that forced me to slow down, which was something I think I was almost afraid to do. And it's been really good. All right.

Abigail Jurusik
So knowing what you know now, what do you think that individuals communities, or governments or even schools need to keep in mind for the future?

Mackenzie Shay
I think that it's just important to make sure that we're always doing proper, you know, like, washing hands and keeping things clean. Because we never know when. Hopefully, we won't have another pandemic like this that happens but germs are everywhere all the time. So I think that a lot of things are going I think there are going to be changes to The, I don't know, I almost I wonder if we're going to be able to go back to normal the way it was. Part of me is like, I feel like people are gonna like Once this is done, Okay, moving on or moving on, like vn. But other parts of me I thinking that once this is over, we're going to continue to hopefully maintain these like best practices of washing things and cleaning things and keeping ourselves healthy. Right?

Abigail Jurusik
Yeah. How do you think this is going to affect schools after this? Like, do you think it's going to affect class sizes? Or like when you think of like a, like elementary school kids, you know, there's 30 in a room yelling each other, like, how do you think this is going to impact it afterwards? I mean,

Mackenzie Shay
I don't want to go back and forth. Like that's part of why I think it's going to be hard for schools to open up for a while until we have a vaccine for this because we can't be putting that many kids that close together. When they're coming from all over the cities and everything. But I don't know if it's feasible to make class sizes that much smaller, it would be ideal to make class sizes smaller, but I don't know if schools are gonna be able to afford that. So I think it's just gonna offer teachers are gonna have to just be really good about making sure that before like snack for elementary school, students are really washing their hands and actually washing their hands and wiping down tables every night and wiping them desks and like at the secondary level between classes, we'll probably have to wipe down desks for a while. And that'll be interesting, because, you know, I remember when I was in high school, I was, I was kind of a germaphobe myself, so I was like, how many people have been sitting in his desk? You know, there's so many different classes every day. And when was the last time these are cleaned? You know, ideally, maybe they'd be cleaned once a week. But how often does that actually happen? You know, I feel like I'm so I think that's going to just be like a practice the teachers. You have to Should they are getting desks like bound maybe students will even like help wipe down desks have in the class over the last 10 minutes, we're going to spray all the desks and wipe them out.

Abigail Jurusik
Right? So maybe just like foundational changes to know something's just may not be feasible to change your entire system right now. Is that yeah.

Mackenzie Shay
Yeah, I mean, there are things that could happen. We could reduce class sizes that would maybe help. But I just I don't think it's useful.

Abigail Jurusik
Like as things are now, like that would, yeah. Have to be like a larger tree. Yeah. Yeah. All right. Well, thank you so much for your time, McKenzie. I had a really great time interviewing you for this project.

Mackenzie Shay
You're welcome.

Date Accepted (Dublin Core)

2020/05/22 12:42:44 AM AST

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